Full-time software engineer since 2016. UCLA Computer Science B.S. with Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences minor, class of ‘16.
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Original photo by Yancy Min on Unsplash; illustration by Tremaine Eto.

When you’re making pull requests in Bitbucket, GitHub, GitLab, SourceForge, or other Git servers as a services, then often you’ll run into the scenario where unwanted modified files make it into your PR.

Now, the reasons for why you want to remove it are plentiful. It could simply be that you accidentally ran $ git add on the file or on its directory and added it accidentally. It could be that the file has only formatting changes or newlines or spaces that don’t really need to make it in the target branch. …


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Original photo by Anthony Tran on Unsplash

There are times where you want to remove the background of a picture to leave just the object or person in the foreground.

There are ways of doing this with tools like Photoshop, GIMP, Pixlr, and more, but they require a little bit of know-how, effort, and precision. The method that I’m going to show you today literally takes seconds and is easy for anyone to do. Also, I’m not at all affiliated with this site; just thought it was cool.

The site is called, fittingly, remove.bg. When you go there, you’re met with the following landing page:


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Original photo by David Clode on Unsplash; logo available for use by Python; text by Tremaine Eto.

For those starting out with programming, Python is, according to several sources like the 2020 Stack Overflow Developer Survey and Statistics and Data, the leader in the clubhouse.

The reasons for this are numerous, but by and large it’s because it’s less verbose, less low-level, and less syntactically complicated than many other languages. The fact that you don’t have to worry about weird semicolons and the like is a huge benefit for beginners.

When starting out with any language, the natural question arises: what do I use to start? …


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Photo by Unseen Histories on Unsplash.

I recently got a box from my family of some of my childhood school assignments and works which I kept mostly because deep down, I didn’t want my work to go to waste.

In that box, I found a calendar from 2011 — ten years ago from the writing of this article (“time flies” is something I mutter to myself more and more these days).

In that calendar is printed an essay I wrote for a writing contest back when I was 16 years old. The contest was put on by a non-profit which “has worked to create systemic change…


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Eyes on the road. Photo by Samuele Errico Piccarini on Unsplash

Something I always enjoy looking at is my Google Maps Timeline. It’s fun to see all the places I’ve been, the sights I’ve seen, the miles I’ve driven; it’s like a digital time capsule of my life (and, of course, a ton of data that Google has on me).

Having said that, I knew that the stats for 2020 would be really different and really interesting. …


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Original photo by ammiel jr on Unsplash; logo by Anchore; text by Tremaine Eto.

Anchore is a nice product available via open-source and an enterprise solution for identifying security vulnerabilities and flaws in container images. Through my day-to-day work, I’ve been able to become quite familiar with working with it; after all, its ability to be integrated into the software delivery lifecycle has made it pretty seamless.

Before we start, what does Anchore scan?

When you provide a Docker image to Anchore, it can return to you the security vulnerabilities pertaining to the associated application, operating system packages, secrets, passwords, third-party libraries, Dockerfile, and more.

Additionally, it has configuration for both blocklists and allowlists to fine-tune your deployment process; after all…


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Original Photo by Tachina Lee on Unsplash; Java logo fair use; text by Tremaine Eto.

If you ever want to really bring the fun to a Zoom party, then you can quiz your friends on when you use length vs length() vs size() in Java. Admittedly, this kind of conversation would probably only go well in niche programmer friend circles, but alas.

But seriously: in school or on the job, it’s not always easy to remember which one to use when you simply want to get how long or how many elements are in something.

This may seem like an intro-to-programming concept, but honestly I wouldn’t be surprised if most of the people you ask…


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Photo by Michael on Unsplash; logo by Lua (freely available); text by Tremaine Eto.

When it comes to programming in a certain language, one of the most important decisions — besides simply starting — is the editor or the Integrated Development Environment (IDE) to use.

The choice isn’t a one-time thing where you choose and are locked in, but choosing wisely can really lead to reduced headaches not only now but down the road. …


An after-school program to learn programming.

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Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash. Text by Tremaine Eto.

At-home school has been challenging for parents across the world, but one of the aspects I don’t see discussed as much in the public sphere is the role that the lack of after-school activities has played in making things even more stressful.

Whether it’s after-school clubs or study halls or sports, there’s been a general void and a lack of transition from the classroom — virtual or not — to home.

Recently, I caught wind of the Los Angeles Public Library offering something to help with this, and it turns out that it’s something I’m passionate about: helping anyone who…


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Original photo by Maxim Zhgulev on Unsplash; logos by Sectigo and Namecheap; illustration by Tremaine Eto.

If you’re looking to add SSL — in simple terms, getting that nice lock icon in visitors’ browsers and having your URL start with https — to your website, then Comodo PositiveSSL is one of the leading solutions on the market.

For one year, it goes for $8.88; this yearly rate progressively gets cheaper with every year that you pay for up front all the way down to $5.88/year if you commit to four years.

In this article, I’ll go over the process once you pay for the PositiveSSL certificate and check out; I recently did it for my personal…

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